Too Good to Waste: 4 Tips to Up Your Compost Game

With sustainability at the center of our mission as a company, making simple changes to reduce our impact on the environment is a no-brainer. That's why in 2020, Kobee’s made the switch from traditional, plastic lip balm tubes to compostable lip balm tubes in hopes that less plastic would be sent to landfills and eventually enter our ecosystems. Although sending compostable material to landfills reduces plastic pollution, there is a better way to handle compostable waste in a way that benefits our environment. Though most people have a general idea of what compost is, much is unknown about how to compost, so we’re here to provide some tips to get you started in the right direction.

First, let’s start with the purpose of composting. Organic waste, such as food scraps, yard waste, and our compostable lip balm tubes, are large contributors to our stream of waste. When these materials decompose in our landfills, they produce climate destroying methane gas because they're unable to break down when sandwiched between trash. Instead of benefitting our environment like organic waste should and can, it’s adding to our climate crisis. When broken down properly, through composting, organic waste can benefit our soil and reduce landfill and methane emissions. Overall, composting replenishes and fertilizes soil by adding organic waste, while also limiting the amount of organic waste sent to landfills.

Compost bin with food scraps

So now we know why composting is important, but how do we go about doing it? Although the process is a little more complicated than one might imagine, it can be easier with the right information. For those who don’t have composting programs available through their city or residential building, these essential tips will help get you on the right track.

 

1. Composting is all about balance

Compost can be divided into two groups: greens and browns. Balancing these two types along with the amount of soil is the key difference between a successful compost pile and a poor one. Greens are materials that are nitrogen-rich, such as grass clippings or food waste, while browns are higher in carbon, such as dried leaves and paper shavings, or our compostable lip balm tubes. These three components are meant to be alternated and layered, not too much of one or the other. If you add a bowl of food scraps to the compost pile, toss in some leaves and your empty Kobee’s lip balm tube, and then top with a dusting of soil.

2. Not all organic waste should be composted

Although all organic waste can be composted, there’s a few items that should be left out. Manure from carnivorous domestic pets, meat, eggs, dairy, and oily foods are some of the main wastes that should be left out. Before adding a new waste to your compost pile, it’s best to do some research.

3. Balance, balance, balance

Remember when we said balance is important? Balance is needed throughout the entire composting process. Once you’ve balanced your greens, browns, and soil, you then need to consider the location of your pile in order to balance the air, moisture, and sun your pile receives. Making sure your compost pile isn’t somewhere extremely hot and sunny, but also isn’t somewhere too cool and damp, is crucial to successful compost. As well, periodically turning your pile will allow for airflow while also making sure your pile is wet but not overly saturated.

4. Small pieces are best

Any size piece of organic waste will eventually break down, however, the smaller the piece, the faster it will break down. Consider cutting your organic waste into smaller pieces before placing it in the pile in order to speed up the process. 


Composting doesn’t have to be difficult. With a little bit of research and effort, you can create a pile that will reduce landfill and harmful methane emissions while also replenishing your soil. Join Kobee’s in rethinking traditional plastic packaging and try out our compostable lip balm tubes for yourself. When you're finished with your balm, use your new composting skills to put your empty tube to good use in your compost pile.

For more information and tips for composting, you can visit: https://www.npr.org/2020/04/07/828918397/how-to-compost-at-home

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